Course Outline: TB 401 Tibetan Buddhism, 2010/2011, Semester 2

Basic Data
Program: 
Bachelor of Arts (Buddhist Studies)
Semester: 
Second Semester (December 06, 2010 – April 09, 2011) Academic year 2010/2011
Credit / status: 
3 credits / Major subject
Course Organization: 

This course will be organized based on lectures, written assignment, mid-term and final examinations. The course is for 15 weeks (45 instructional hours) and covers the following topics:

1. Indian Background
2. Pre-Buddhist Indigenous Culture
3. Introduction of Buddhism:

  • 3.1. The Early History of Tibet
  • 3.2. The Reign of Three Religious Kings
  • 3.3. Persecution of Buddhism
  • 3.4. The Second Dissemination of Buddhism

4. Impact of the Transmission of Indian Buddhism
5. Formations of the Four Schools of Tibetan Buddhism:

  • 5. 1. Nyingma
  • 5. 2. Kagyu
  • 5. 3. Sakya
  • 5. 4. Geluk

6. Rime, the Non-sectarian Movement
7. Tibetan Buddhist Art and Iconography

  • 7.1. Background
  • 7.2. Symbolism of Tibetan Buddhist Art and Iconography
  • 7.3. Visual Representations of Tibetan Buddhist Deities and Symbols

8. Essentials of Esoteric Buddhism.

Course Requirements: 

Students should be present in a minimum of 80% of the schedule classes to be eligible to sit for the final examination. All students will be required:

  • 1. To complete one written assignment during the term.
  • 2. To complete written Mid-term examination/ presentation.
Allocation of Marks: 
  • 1. Class participation 10%
  • 2. Written Assignment 20%
  • 3. Mid-term Examination 20%
  • 4. Final Examination 50%
Course Objectives: 

Vajrayāna, which derives from Mahāyāna, is the school most closely associated with Tibetan Buddhism, so integral part of it that it has become virtually identified with the religion of Tibet. Although Vajrayāna may appear divergent from “original” Buddhism, it is considered to be authentic by its followers and scholars. The purpose of this course is to make students understand the nature of “Tibetan Buddhism” in its right context. With a better knowledge of the background, the students will be able to understand and appreciate Tibetan Buddhism more openly.

Grading: 

All tests, assignments and examinations are graded as follows with grade point and numerical marks:

Grade Performance Grade value Percentage Equivalence
A+ Excellent 4.0 90-100
A Almost Excellent 3.75 85-89
A- Fairly Excellent 3.5 80-84
B+ Very Good 3.25 75-79
B Good 3.0 70-74
B- Fairly Good 2.75 65-69
C+ Fair 2.5 60-64
C Satisfactory 2.25 55-59
C- Minimum Satisfactory 2.0 50-54
D+ Fairly Poor 1.5 40-49
D Poor 1.0 30-39
F Fail 0.0 29 or less
I Incomplete
W Withdrawn
WF Withdrawn because of failure
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